Texas House committee releases Uvalde shooting report

A preliminary report by the Texas House investigative committee probing the Uvalde, Texas, school massacre outlines multiple failures by several entities, including the overall law enforcement response, Robb Elementary school, the shooter’s family, and social media platforms.

Families are expected to meet with the committee Sunday afternoon to discuss the 77-page report.

CNN is reviewing the report now.

CNN is reviewing Uvalde preliminary report
From CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz and Matthew J. Friedman

CNN has obtained and is reviewing a preliminary report by a Texas House investigative committee on the Uvalde, Texas, school massacre that left 21 dead, more than a month after the group began its search for answers.

The report was made available to victims’ families Sunday morning.

Here’s what we know about the Texas House committee’s report on the Uvalde school massacre

A preliminary report by the Texas House investigative committee probing the Uvalde, Texas, school massacre outlines a series of failures by multiple law enforcement agencies, describing “an overall lackadaisical approach” by authorities on the scene of the shooting in which 21 people were killed.

It’s just one of the findings in the 77-page report, which also details failures by several other entities, including the Uvalde school system, the shooter’s family and social media platforms.

Here are key facts from the report:

  • Responders failed to prioritize saving the lives of innocent victims over their own safety: The report outlined the multiple failures by several entities, including law enforcement responders wasting “precious time” securing their own safety instead of prioritizing “the rescue of innocent victims.” The report said, “At Robb Elementary, law enforcement responders failed to adhere to their active shooter training, and they failed to prioritize saving the lives of innocent victims over their own safety.” The report added, “The void of leadership could have contributed to the loss of life as injured victims waited over an hour for help, and the attacker continued to sporadically fire his weapon.”
  • 376 responders from various agencies were on scene the day of the massacre: Citing information from the Texas Department of Public Safety, the Texas House Uvalde massacre report publicly accounts for the breakdown of responders by agency. Of the 376 responders, 149 were from the United States Border Patrol, 14 were from the Department of Homeland Security, and 91 were from the Texas Department of Public Safety, the report outlines. The report also states that 25 responders were from Uvalde Police Department, 16 were from San Antonio Police Department (SWAT), and 16 were from the Uvalde County Sheriff’s Office. The report does not itemize when each of these responding officials arrived on site.
  • Uvalde school police chief failed to assume his “responsibility of incident command”: First responders at the scene “lost critical momentum” by treating the situation as a “barricaded subject” scenario instead of an “active shooter” scenario, the report stated. There was no law enforcement on scene when the shooter “came over the fence and toward the school.” Uvalde School Police Chief Pete Arredondo “did not assume his pre-assigned responsibility of incident command,” and other officers on scene didn’t offer assistance with incident command. Arredondo stayed in the hallway where he lacked “reliable communication with other law enforcement and he was unable to effectively implement staging or command and control of the situation.” Arredondo didn’t have his radios with him, so was unaware of 911 dispatch conversations because of “his failure to establish a reliable method of receiving critical information outside the building.”
  • Robb Elementary School lockdown likely delayed by “poor Wi-Fi connectivity”: The report reached a preliminary conclusion that “not all teachers received timely notice of the lockdown.” It stated, “Poor Wi-Fi connectivity in Robb Elementary likely delayed the lockdown alert,” and not all teachers received the alert immediately, according to the report. The report said the school intercom wasn’t used to communicate during the lockdown. “As a result, not all teachers received timely notice of the lockdown.”
  • Robb Elementary had “recurring problems with maintaining its doors and locks: Robb Elementary School had “recurring problems with maintaining its doors and locks,” according to the preliminary conclusions from a Texas House investigative committee’s report on the Robb Elementary School massacre in Uvalde. “In particular the locking mechanism to Room 111 was widely known to be faulty, yet it was not repaired,” the report said. “Robb Elementary had a culture of noncompliance with safety policies requiring doors to be kept locked, which turned out to be fatal,” the report said.
    Family members of Uvalde school shooter “uniformly refused to buy guns for him”: The report outlined information that was available about the shooter, Salvador Ramos. According to the report, the shooter had an “unstable home life,” including a mother struggling with substance abuse issues and and no father figure. The shooter’s family “moved often and lived in relative poverty.” Family members of the shooter knew that he was estranged from his mother and that leading up to his 18th birthday, “he asked for help in making straw gun purchases which would have been illegal.” Family members “uniformly refused to buy guns for him,” the report stated.

 

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