Alabama teen, 16, who shot dead his family of five when he found out he wasn’t biologically related to his mom in 2019 also tried to poison her by triggering nut allergy with peanut butter in her coffee, new court docs reveal

  • Before fatally shooting his parents and three siblings execution-style, then 14-year-old Mason Wayne Sisk tried to poison his stepmother
  • Sisk is also accused of stealing jewelry from his stepmother and grandmother, burning live animals and breaking into his school before the killings
  • The murders allegedly ensued after Sisk, 19, learned his stepmother was not his biological mom
  • The September 2019 massacre rocked Elkmont, Alabama

An Alabama teenager accused of killing five members of his family had previously attempted to poison his stepmother with peanut butter, a new court file reveals.

Before allegedly fatally shooting his parents and three siblings – including his infant brother – execution-style, then-14-year-old Mason Wayne Sisk had tried to poison his stepmother by putting peanut butter in her coffee, knowing she was allergic, according to authorities.

The harrowing murders allegedly ensued after Sisk, 19, found out his stepmother was not his biological mother. The September 2019 massacre rocked the small town of Elkmont.

The new filing also alleges that Sisk had been threatening towards his father and forceful with his three young half-siblings, News19 reported.

Sisk is also accused by prosecutors of stealing jewelry from his stepmother and grandmother.

He faces one count of capital murder of two or more victims, and three counts of capital murder of a victim under the age of 14. Sisk will appear in court on August 12 for a pre-trial hearing.

On the day of the alleged crimes, around 11pm on September 2, 2019, Sisk called 911 to report a shooting.

The then-14-year-old boy initially told responding deputies that he had been in the basement of his family’s home in the 2500 block of Ridge Road in Elkmont when he heard gunfire upstairs.

According to investigators, Sisk later confessed to killing his family and led officers to the murder weapon, a 9mm pistol, which was legally held at the residence.

The victims of the shooting were identified as his father, John Sisk, 38; his stepmother, Mary Sisk, 35; his two half-brothers, six-month-old Colson and six-year-old Grayson, and his half-sister Aurora, aged five.

According to a 2020 report from a juvenile probation officer, Sisk ‘had not shown any sign of remorse’ for allegedly committing the atrocious crimes.

The document obtained by WAAY states: ‘Mason does not seem bothered by the fact he’s accused of murdering his family… While in detention, he has not talked about his family at all.’

Sisk’s probation officer noted that, other than getting several warnings and two disciplinary infractions, mostly for talking without permission, the teenager had been a model inmate.

‘While in detention, Mason follows directions, does his schoolwork and interacts well with others,’ the report reads.

Sisk’s cousin Daisy McCarty told the station WAFF in 2019 that she believed the killings were sparked by a revelation that Mary Sisk was not his birth mother.

‘He didn’t know any different of who his mom was. And they just recently told him, and I think that’s really what triggered the little boy, to be honest with you,’ she said.

Sisk also had been acting out in the months preceding the murders by burning live animals and breaking into his school, she said.

Mary Sisk, originally from New Orleans, was a special education teacher for Huntsville City Schools, according to a biography on the website of Mountain Gap Schools.

‘I can’t think of any better person to be with us during the time she was needed,’ Evon Miller, whose granddaughter was in Mary’s class, told WZDX in 2020.

John Sisk had a number of jobs, including at a Harley Davidson shop, and had graduated from a Paul Mitchell cosmetology school.

 

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